How To Be Charming

How To Be Charming

An illusive topic that doesn’t get much attention is the art of being charming.  The following are Brian Kim’s insights into the subject. We can’t articulate it, but we know a charming person when we see one. It’s that person at the party who seems to know everybody. He works the crowd with such ease and has a positive aura about him, and everybody just seems drawn to him like steel to a magnet. He leaves people thinking “What a great guy!” and seems to have it all together. I would be a fool if I wrote an article on how to be charming if I wasn’t charming to begin with. I don’t mean to say I’m the most charming man on the face of the earth, but I do have my moments. I’ve reflected back on those moments, studied other charismatic people, read books on the subject, and asked other charismatic people to share their insights on this elusive trait. You know what I learned? Charisma is not genetic. It can be learned. On to the 8 tips. 1. Get your own life in order first. When everything is going right in your life, the world is your oyster. You’re in the zone, you’re on top of the world, you feel invincible, like everything has fallen into place just for you. You don’t have a single worry in the world and you feel like singing and dancing in the rain. With this kind of mental state, it’s a double edged sword. It can lead you to become the most charismatic person in the world, or the most obnoxious...
A Step-by-Step Process to Teach Yourself Anything (in a Fraction of the Time)

A Step-by-Step Process to Teach Yourself Anything (in a Fraction of the Time)

Another amazing post from Scott Young’s blog.  This one really hit home and has ALOT of useful information. Original Post HERE Have you ever wanted to learn something, but weren’t sure where to start? Maybe you want to learn a language, programming or business. Maybe you want the confidence to tackle supposedly “hard” subjects like math, finance or physics. Today I’m going to show you how. I’m going to describe the process I’ve used to condense a lot of learning into a short period of time. This is the same process I used to learn MIT’s 4-year computer science curriculum in twelve months, teach myself languages, business and intellectual subjects like physics and psychology. This article is going to be a bit longer (~3500 words), so you may want to bookmark it for later. I’m going to focus on the strategy for learning, meaning how you choose to break down a nebulous goal like “learn to speak French” or “understand personal finance” into something concrete and actionable. As much as possible, I’ll try to provide links to specific low-level tactics I use, such as the Feynman technique, visual mnemonics or active recall as well. This strategy is just one possibility. If you’ve found success with another, by all means, go ahead! I only want to share the method I’ve been honing for years across a variety of different subjects. The Steps in 2-Minutes If you’re short on reading time, I’ll summarize the steps for you: Take your learning goal, and craft it into a compelling, obsession-worthy mission. Find material to learn from, structure it into a flexible curriculum. Define feedback mechanisms...
The Typical Journey of Self Improvment

The Typical Journey of Self Improvment

I was on one of my favorite blogs: BrianKim.net and this post was very interesting: Remember your first self improvement book? After reading it, you probably got “pumped” up. You felt like you could do anything. Open that business, get that job, get the raise. You felt invincible……and then a couple of weeks later, you were down again. So you went to the bookstore and got another book. Another incredible high after you read it. You believed in yourself, took action, felt invincible…..and then a couple weeks later, you became down again. This depicts the first phase that people go through on their journey of self improvement. They rely on books, speakers, or tapes to “pump” them up, to tell them that they CAN do it. It’s true though. You CAN do it. Everything you need to accomplish anything you want is already inside of you. You CAN do it. This is the basis, the foundation, the thesis if you will, of all self improvement. Everything hangs upon that simple fact. This addiction to the pump of “I can do” it lasts until that fact gets ingrained in your mind. Once that happens, you go on to the second phase of self improvement, which is mass absorption of knowledge. You start looking for the how to part. It’s not enough to know that everything you need is already inside you. You want to know how to use that something which is inside of you (your mind) to achieve your goals. Slowly you start to gain knowledge on positive thinking, visualization, goal setting, the power of beliefs, reframing, discipline, etc....
How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time

How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time

Recently I read an article by Scott H Young that made an impression on me and I wanted to share it here. You can read the original post here. “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.” If you’ve ever ran more than a few miles, you probably understand why you need to pace yourself. Runners that sprint at the start of a race will be exhausted far before they cross the finish line. The same principle applies when trying to get work done. One solution for pacing my work that I’ve found incredibly effective is maintaining weekly/daily to-do lists. Weekly/Daily To-Do Lists The principle behind the WD To-Do List method is simple: At the end of the week, write a list containing everything you want to get accomplished. At the end of the day, write a list containing what parts of that weekly list you want to be finished tomorrow. After you finish your daily list, you stop. Don’t work on more projects or tasks. You have the rest of the day to relax. And after you finish the weekly list, you’re done for the week. This means if you finish by Friday afternoon, you don’t start work again until Monday morning. Although this technique might sound obvious (and it is), there are some key advantages using a WD system has over the typical, Getting Things Done approach of keeping Next Action or project lists. Why the Weekly/Daily To-Do List System Rocks: After using this method for several months, I’ve found it beats the other systems in a few key places: 1) A WD system...
A Minimalist’s Train of Thought

A Minimalist’s Train of Thought

I‘ve considered myself a minimalist for a couple years now and have been working towards a lifestyle that is based less on consumption and more about sustainability and contribution.  I came across this website the other day and the author has a nice little creed that sums up what a minimalist thinks like: A Minimalist’s Train of Thought Less money spent means more money saved More money saved means the longer you can live in financial peace and security Financial peace and security comes from owning less Less stuff owned means less to carry around, move or have to travel with Less responsibility for your stuff also means less maintenance and more time The more time you have, the more relaxed you will feel The more relaxed you are, the less you will care about stuff If you care less about stuff, it means you’ll care less about image If you care less about image, you will care more about experiences and memories If you care more about experiences and memories, you will be happier with less If you are happier with less, you’ll never want or need for more The less you want or need for more, the more you will feel free – The Everyday Minimalist /Ethan...
Everyman Sleep Schedule Starts NOW

Everyman Sleep Schedule Starts NOW

A number of days ago I tweeted something to the effect of “Time to give Polyphasic Sleep Another Go” For those of you that don’t know what a Polyphasic Sleep Cycle is its quite simple.  You sleep for only 2 hours a day.  Those 2 hours are divided up into six 20 minute naps spread every 4 hours. So basically I would nap for 20 mins at:  0200, 0600, 1000, 1400, 1800 & 2200.  It does work and has been adopted by many however it is very hard to adapt to at first. Just think what you could do with 22 hours a day? You would get so much done.  I could study for 4 hours and play video games for 4 hours and still have 12 hours of time to fill. I did polyphasic sleep 2 years ago for a week and it was really cool.  The reason I stopped was that I got lazy and missed naps which caused me to crash.  Polyphasic sleep requires much discipline.  If your in the middle of something at 2 in the afternoon and you have to stop it and go to sleep this isn’t always easy. There are also other constraints like work which can be awkward finding a place to nap while on the job. STILL I maintain that a polyphasic sleep schedule is completely worth the minor pitfalls.  I was all gung-ho on Friday to try it out but didn’t make it past the second nap and just fell asleep.  At that point I put Polyphasic Sleep on the back burner and decided to adopt the Everyman Sleep...